Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

Karlie Dibell, Contributor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On January 26th, Governor Doug Ducey signed the Arizona Opioid Epidemic Act. This act applies to everyone, but mostly focuses on the younger people. Many people have been “struggling” with their addiction to the Opioids and the act is supposed to help stop the Opioid epidemic throughout Arizona, which Ducey has claimed as a “public health emergency”. According to the National Center of Addiction and Substance Abuse, nine out of 10 people with substance issues started using by the age of 18.

The law has changed many aspects in the treatment of addictions such as limiting the amounts of drugs given out in prescriptions and increasing training. They also increased the access of naloxone or a synthetic drug similar to morphine.

According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, around 812 people recorded between the period of June 2017 to January 2018 of Arizona has died from suspected opioid overdoses. This has been recorded . Representative,  Pamela Powers Hannley, explained that addictions began to reach epidemic status mainly through the over prescription and misuse of painkillers. In 2001, the Joint Commission began suggesting that doctors ask their patients about their pain levels when they take vital signs like blood pressure and temperature, though they leave it up to individual hospitals to make the final decision. Pamela Powers Hannley said an increased focus on pain levels during medical examinations worsened the overprescribing of opioids.

Powers Hannley said doctors fear to receive a poor rating from patients, which leads them to overprescribe opioids. “What they’ve found is that patients are more likely to complain about doctors if they ask for a prescription and don’t get it,” Pamela Powers Hannley explains. Cody Holt, a global studies senior and the director of operations for ASU’s Students for Sensible Drug Policy, said the bill is a good step in the right direction but doesn’t go far enough. “What I was most disappointed about this law is that it only covers … a five year time span,” Holt said. “I think the point of them having a five year time span is that they can get everyone to agree on it however, in my opinion, what it does is effectively promotes the idea of dealing with it later. College is a really big time for exploration and self discovery and we think it’s important to tell students that these issues are issues that they will face in real life. Whether you chose to engage in substance usage or not,” Holt explains.

Dr. Karen Moses, who oversees ASU’s Recovery Rising program, said it can be difficult for college students to juggle their addiction and recovery with school.
Some new treatment centers are trying to help college students continue their education while in recovery so they don’t have to choose between recovery and school, she said. “This past spring of 2017, the data indicates that 3.7 percent of ASU students have a history of addiction,” Moses said. “A lot of times what happens when someone has an active addiction, they do need to take time off of school.”

Source:

http://www.statepress.com/article/2018/02/sppolitics-opioid-crisis-reaches-asu

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    Terrorism in Toronto

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    RED FOR ED Movement

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    Department of Transportation: Arizona

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    No In-State Tuition For DACA

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    Southwest Plane Engine Explodes

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    #RedForEd Teachers Walkout

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    Weather Crisis: Fiji

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    Clear Backpacks Hit the Halls

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    Russian Spies Poisoned on British Soil

  • Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act

    News

    Baby that Changed History

Doug Ducey and the Opioid Act