Hurricane Harvey, the ‘Grave Risk’

Karlie Dibell, Contributor

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The largest hurricane in recent history was Hurricane Bret, a category three in that struck in 1999. However, Hurricane Bret could have some competition from Hurricane Harvey, which has just struck Texas. Hurricane Harvey came in through the Gulf of Mexico as a major tropical storm, late Friday and early Saturday, the 25th and 26th. Harvey passed through the Windward Islands, becoming an open wave. Then it reformed and headed toward the Gulf of Mexico as a category three storm, and it is quickly gaining strength.

Fox News has stated that Texas should receive up to 30 inches of rain along the coastline that goes into southwestern Texas. Texas has not received a hurricane this strong since 2008, when Hurricane Ike hit with a wind speed of 143 mph and major coastline flooding. Ike caused extensive amounts of damage all throughout Texas, and it was only a category two. Hurricane Harvey, as previously mentioned, is a category three and is still growing! Students and staff of Texas A&M are going ballistic, and are evacuating as quickly as possible. Many families have been gathering their belongings as quickly as possible, making sure to store food, water, and gas.

When Hurricane Harvey started out, the winds clocked in at about 80 mph but now has progressed to nearly 111 mph. On Wednesday of August 23, 2017, Governor Greg Abbot of Texas was warned of a “severe flooding” and an impending “state of disaster”. Then Ted Cruz posted on Facebook to warn everyone, “This is a serious storm with strong winds, and what forecasters have predicted will potentially be a historic amount of rainfall that will significantly raise the risk of serious and life threatening flood.” Hurricane Harvey could be the biggest hurricane in history, and Texas is right in its path of destruction.

Meteorologists have called this a “flooding catastrophe”. They have predicted that Harvey will slow down on land once it hits. That means that there will be even more rainfall. Some of the luckier areas of Texas are expected to flood approximately 2-7 feet, while the other, less-lucky areas are expected to flood around 6-10 feet. Texas isn’t the only state that expects to feel the wrath of this severe storm, but also Louisiana. Texas and Louisiana have been bracing for this storm, as they expect many of the populated areas to be hit.

President Trump has tweeted that people should plan ahead of time because Hurricane Harvey is gaining strength quickly. He exclaims, “As #HurricaneHarvey intensifies – #planAhead and be safe.” Greg Abbot spoke with President Trump and said that he has activated nearly 700 members of the state’s National Guard in preparation for Harvey. The warning of Hurricane Harvey was issued to the public Thursday, August 24, 2017. That has given the people not a lot of time to prepare and leave Texas and Louisiana. All we can do now is hope that the storm is not as bad we as is predicted!

 

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1 Comment

One Response to “Hurricane Harvey, the ‘Grave Risk’”

  1. Pete Hall on August 26th, 2017 11:05 am

    Very good reporting !!
    Lets hope as you say,Its not as bad as predicted !!!!

    [Reply]

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