The Fall of Skywalker

The Fall of Skywalker

Oliver Jamias, Contributor

The third trilogy of the Star Wars franchise has constantly received mixed reviews.  The Force Awakens —despite receiving criticism for having an extremely similar storyline to A New Hope of the original trilogy– was still considered overall a decent film.  The Last Jedi was a similar case, with critics harshly reviewing it while audience reviews loved it.

However, the latest and final film of the sequel trilogy, The Rise of Skywalker, had perhaps the most polarizing reviews out of all Star Wars films, period.  The reviewers who claim that the movie is bad are not exactly wrong either.

Arguably the biggest problem with the movie is the directing style.  Like The Force Awakens, The Rise of Skywalker is directed by J. J. Abrams.  This brings up another problem in itself, where the loose ends left by Rian Johnson after The Last Jedi do not really end up amounting to anything important.  Going back to Abrams’s style of directing, the movie ends up suffering from poor pacing, lackluster writing, and a rather absurd storyline.

The way the movie was paced is the greatest issue following the directing style.  During the first half of the movie, the film constantly switched pacing, sometimes feeling too slow and other times feeling too fast.  The movie never settled into a suitable pace, which could cause viewers to either try to catch up with whatever happened or to simply become bored with the monotonous pace.  This issue with the movie is most likely to deter people from liking it.

Another big problem with the movie was that, oftentimes, the writing felt mediocre and lazy, and this ended up affecting the story as a whole.  Palpatine, a character who was thought to be dead for 2 movies, shows up and the movie never makes an effort to explain how aside from simply stating that he was back in the beginning of the film.  Another example of this type of writing was the reveal of who’s Rey’s family was, which was never alluded to in the past 2 movies and is never elaborated upon aside from who Rey’s grandfather was.

This movie, which was supposed to be the big finale for the Skywalker Saga, ended up being painfully average for a Star Wars movie.  While not necessarily a terrible movie on its own, the expectations set on it cause The Rise of Skywalker to not rise, but to fall short of what is expected.

Sources:

https://www.newyorker.com/culture/the-front-row/the-robotic-familiarity-of-star-wars-the-rise-of-skywalker

https://www.ravereviews.org/entertainment/review-the-rise-of-skywalker/