Creature – Album Review

Rhys Green, Contributor

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Every heroic individual who has trampled through the cheery depths of Gilbert, Arizona has come across the deity known as Thomas Parker. This 19-year-old menace began his career with his numerous film projects that were displayed across the student-ran video program, The Studio. This high school career only launched this man into further creative endeavors such as starting a band. This band took many different guises in their early days. This amateur band lineup changed from a pop-punk duo to a batch of an impressive 5-piece dream-pop dudes. However, perhaps the most impressive feat from this group of lads was the fact that they were able to remain with their original name for the majority of their evolution. This entity proudly carried their band banner, Rubberneck.

After a couple of organized shows consisting of their backyard – and even a yogurt joint – this group found themselves in the unfortunate happenstance of graduation. It was time for these dudes to move on and pursue their own personal paths. Few stayed home and others ventured to neighboring cities. However, Parker found himself in the glorious land of milk and honey. Utah supposedly appeared to treat Thomas well and he even found himself returning to AZ for a quick reunion show in the winter. Yet, it was only a couple weeks later after this show when Parker would finally release his own single, “Darling.” This quickly sprung Parker to a 100+ monthly fans where each loyal listener simply begged to hear more of this dreamy and entrancing collection of chords and tones. The rest of these self-produced songs were introduced to the world a couple months later with the April 4th release titled, “Creature.” These 5 endearing songs quickly captivated the hearts of many close friends of Parker. Tracks such as “Friends I Don’t Deserve” and “This Song Hurts to Sing” especially resonate with his dearest playfellows. There are also a couple lighthearted tracks such as “Beautiful” and “American Daydream.” Although they still recall the dreamy and somber mood of the other familiar pieces, the guitar lightly plucks onto positive notes.

To put it briefly, this release is simply the first step of Parker’s career. As for now, fans must anxiously anticipate whatever he puts out next. Whether it be more mesmerizing guitar parts or an entirely new genre, it is almost certain that Thomas Parker! will follow up this 9/10 release with new and improved quality tunes.

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Rhys Green, Contributor

Okay so basically I'm Rhys Green and I am writing.

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