Proposition 126, 127, 305 Explained

Cade McAfee, writer

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Proposition 126 states that the government should not be allowed to raise taxes on services. Just how there is tax on food and goods, there are taxes on services like hair cuts, doing taxes, and other services provided by businesses. This proposal not only prevents the future taxing of services, but gets rid of all the current service taxes. The average Americans response to a proposition limiting a form of taxing is probably positive. This tax would hurt the businesses more than the consumer because they would have to charge more and potentially lose customers. If voters were to get rid of this tax, the government would lose a source of it revenue, but the citizens and businesses would be able to avoid another tax. Passing this prop would be good because it would save consumers money, as well as help businesses out without hurting the income of the government too much.

Proposition 127 states that by the year 2030, half of the energy in Arizona has to be be clean, renewable energy. This bill would increase the price for energy because energy manufacturers like SRP would have to install windmills or solar panels to create this clean energy. Some argue that a necessity for clean energy would lead to new advancements in this technology. This new technology for clean energy sounds great but at a great cost to an Arizonan’s energy prices. According to a story on arizonadailyindependent.com, the average energy prices could triple if Prop 127 was passed but this would lead to more clean renewable energy and advancements in that field. This prop would benefit Arizona’s environment but is it the place of the government to enforce mandatory at taxpayers expense? The government should incentivize clean energy with tax breaks and other initiatives but should not directly force the state to reform 50% of Arizona’s energy in only 12 years.

Proposition 305 allows parents to take the money the government would have been giving to a public school for their child to go there, and give the money to a private school to help the parents with the tuition cost. Each student has a certain amount of money attached to them that the school they go to receives for educating them. People that support public schools would not like this because public schools would be losing money when students leave to go to private schools, which would now be much more affordable. Private schools would want this to get passed because they would be getting more students and more money. This is a good bill to pass because it would create competition between schools which would make public schools want to improve to keep their education.

 

https://ballotpedia.org/Arizona_2018_ballot_measures

arizonadailyindependent.com/2018/09/22/why-you-should-vote-no-on-az-proposition-127-renewable-energy-mandate-update

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Cade McAfee, Contributor

I am Cade McAfee. I go to Benjamin Franklin High School and strive to follow the Charger Way everyday. I stay fit by playing sports and doing weights,...

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